oursoulsaredamned:

Skull Hive by Luke Dwyer

oursoulsaredamned:

Skull Hive by Luke Dwyer

1,866 notes

leseanthomas:

"See that house with the Ivy on it? From that rooftop, what if you leapt onto the next rooftop, dashed over that blue & green wall, climbed and jumped up the pipe, ran across the roof and jumped to the next? You can, in animation.

If you could walk along the cable, you could see the other side. When you look from above, so many things reveal themselves to you. Maybe race along the concrete wall. Suddenly, there in your humdrum town there is a magical movie. Isn’t it fun to see things that way? Feels like you could go somewhere far beyond…

                                                                        …maybe you can…”

- Hayao Miyazaki (From ‘The Kingdom of Dreams & Maddness’ Studio Ghibli documentary)

167 notes

cityvillain:

DIVINE

cityvillain:

DIVINE

(via jimstrange)

1,404 notes

superpunch2:

Black Ghost sculpture in Klaipeda, Lithuania by S. Plotnikovas and S. Jurkus.

(via haunted-by-waters)

10,935 notes

"But there are pleasures to be had from books beyond being lightly entertained. There is the pleasure of being challenged; the pleasure of feeling one’s range and capacities expanding; the pleasure of entering into an unfamiliar world, and being led into empathy with a consciousness very different from one’s own; the pleasure of knowing what others have already thought it worth knowing, and entering a larger conversation."

From “The Pleasures of Reading to Impress Yourself" by Rebecca Mead for The New Yorker

What are some challenging reads you’ve enjoyed?

(via strandbooks)

I’ve read a few challenging books but I don’t think any have been as rewarding as Gravity’s Rainbow by Thomas Pynchon. I couldn’t stop thinking about it for ages after I finished it, in a daze, like “What just happened here.”  I just read Pynchon’s Mason & Dixon and that was really, really funny though it took more concentration than my average read on account of the language. 

Ulysses was also a lot of fun (other than the chapter “Oxen of the Sun”, which was a bit beyond me even with notes). I tried Finnegan’s Wake a few years ago but I didn’t get far and I really don’t think I’m ready for it. 

189 notes

nevver:

Calamityware

(Source: twitter.com, via infant-tyrone)

2,937 notes

http://infant-tyrone.tumblr.com/post/85132021185/in-fact-far-from-the-ogre-or-troll-his-son

infant-tyrone:

In fact, far from the Ogre or Troll his son makes him out to be, Charles Sr. is a wistful and spiritual person. He believes that bread is alive,—that the yeast Amimalcula may unite a single purposeful, individual,—that each loaf is so organized, with the crust, for example, serving as skin or…

giuliabeck:

The Gryphon’s Odyssey - 004 by Giuliabeck
Prologue is out, gaaah. X__x Hope I don’t disappoint.

It does not disappoint at all! I’m so excited to finally see the comic you’ve been working so hard on. 

giuliabeck:

The Gryphon’s Odyssey - 004 by Giuliabeck

Prologue is out, gaaah. X__x Hope I don’t disappoint.

It does not disappoint at all! I’m so excited to finally see the comic you’ve been working so hard on. 

7 notes

"Good, Sweet, Honey, Sugar-Candied READER,
Which I think is more than anyone has called you yet, I must have a word or two with you before you do advance into the Treatise; but ‘tis not to beg your pardon for diverting you from your affairs, by such an idle Pamphlet as this is, for I presume you have not much to do and therefore are to be obliged to me for keeping you from worse employment, and if you have a better you may get you gone about your business: but if you will misspend your Time, pray lay the fault upon yourself; for I have dealt pretty fairly in the matter, told you in the Title Page what you are to expect within."

"An Epistle to the Reader" From The Dutch Lover by Aphra Behn.

She was a prolific playwright from the 1600s, but for some reason I’d never heard of her before! Which, judging from this intro, is a huge shame because she’s hilarious. 

3 notes