They rode out along the fenceline and across the open pastureland. The leather creaked in the morning cold. They pushed the horses into a lope. The lights fell away behind them. They rode out on the high prairie where they slowed the horses to a walk and the stars swarmed around them out of the blackness. They heard somewhere in that tenantless night a bell that tolled and ceased where no bell was and they rode out on the round dais of the earth which alone was dark and no light to it and which carried their figures and bore them up into the swarming stars so that they rode not under but among them and they rode at once jaunty and circumspect, like thieves newly loosed in that dark electric, like young thieves in a glowing orchard, loosely jacketed against the cold and ten thousand worlds for the choosing.

Cormac McCarthy, All The Pretty Horses

They rode out along the fenceline and across the open pastureland. The leather creaked in the morning cold. They pushed the horses into a lope. The lights fell away behind them. They rode out on the high prairie where they slowed the horses to a walk and the stars swarmed around them out of the blackness. They heard somewhere in that tenantless night a bell that tolled and ceased where no bell was and they rode out on the round dais of the earth which alone was dark and no light to it and which carried their figures and bore them up into the swarming stars so that they rode not under but among them and they rode at once jaunty and circumspect, like thieves newly loosed in that dark electric, like young thieves in a glowing orchard, loosely jacketed against the cold and ten thousand worlds for the choosing.

Cormac McCarthy, All The Pretty Horses

Jeffrey Combs as Milton Dammers in The Frighteners (1996)

(Source: brierobbie, via kingjackalope)

261 notes


Vincent Price mugs for the camera while taking publicity photos for Roger Corman’s, “The Comedy of Terrors”.

Vincent Price mugs for the camera while taking publicity photos for Roger Corman’s, “The Comedy of Terrors”.

(Source: ghostsareassholes, via spockvarietyhour)

634 notes

ursulavernon:

archiemcphee:

Behold the awesomeness that is Long Ma the fire-breathing dragon-horse, the latest creation by French artist François Delarozière and his art production company La Machine. The 46-ton kinetic sculpture stands almost 40 feet tall and features articulated limbs that can gallop, rear up, and fold beneath him when he wants to sit down. His neck rises and falls and his wonderfully expressive face features eyes that open and close. Best of all, his chest swells from the pressure building in his lungs before he exhales fantastic plumes of smoke from his nostrils and jets of fire from his mouth.

This marvelous interactive sculpture was just debuted in the French city of Nantes and will soon be traveling to Beijing where he’ll be presented in October as part of the celebration of the 50th anniversary of diplomatic relations between France and China. Long Ma is based on a creature from Chinese mythology, Longma, a fabled winged horse with dragon scales, and will be the hero of a performance entitled “Long Ma Jing Shen” or “The Spirit of the Horse Dragon” during which he’ll face off against a giant spider.

Click here and here for video footage of Long Ma in all his fiery glory.

Visit the La Machine Facebook page for additional images.

[via Kotaku:Screenburn and Laughing Squid]

I went to Nante a few years ago and bought a collection of the prints of some of the machines. They are truly spectacular.

(via zylaa)

oursoulsaredamned:

Skull Hive by Luke Dwyer

oursoulsaredamned:

Skull Hive by Luke Dwyer

1,987 notes

leseanthomas:

"See that house with the Ivy on it? From that rooftop, what if you leapt onto the next rooftop, dashed over that blue & green wall, climbed and jumped up the pipe, ran across the roof and jumped to the next? You can, in animation.

If you could walk along the cable, you could see the other side. When you look from above, so many things reveal themselves to you. Maybe race along the concrete wall. Suddenly, there in your humdrum town there is a magical movie. Isn’t it fun to see things that way? Feels like you could go somewhere far beyond…

                                                                        …maybe you can…”

- Hayao Miyazaki (From ‘The Kingdom of Dreams & Maddness’ Studio Ghibli documentary)

174 notes

cityvillain:

DIVINE

cityvillain:

DIVINE

(via jimstrange)

2,092 notes

superpunch2:

Black Ghost sculpture in Klaipeda, Lithuania by S. Plotnikovas and S. Jurkus.

(via haunted-by-waters)

11,503 notes

"But there are pleasures to be had from books beyond being lightly entertained. There is the pleasure of being challenged; the pleasure of feeling one’s range and capacities expanding; the pleasure of entering into an unfamiliar world, and being led into empathy with a consciousness very different from one’s own; the pleasure of knowing what others have already thought it worth knowing, and entering a larger conversation."

From “The Pleasures of Reading to Impress Yourself" by Rebecca Mead for The New Yorker

What are some challenging reads you’ve enjoyed?

(via strandbooks)

I’ve read a few challenging books but I don’t think any have been as rewarding as Gravity’s Rainbow by Thomas Pynchon. I couldn’t stop thinking about it for ages after I finished it, in a daze, like “What just happened here.”  I just read Pynchon’s Mason & Dixon and that was really, really funny though it took more concentration than my average read on account of the language. 

Ulysses was also a lot of fun (other than the chapter “Oxen of the Sun”, which was a bit beyond me even with notes). I tried Finnegan’s Wake a few years ago but I didn’t get far and I really don’t think I’m ready for it. 

194 notes

nevver:

Calamityware

(Source: twitter.com, via infant-tyrone)

2,937 notes